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Hemisphere Coffee Roasters

Haiti Coffee: An Economic Development Proposal

Categories: 2015, JulyTags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Author:

Project Description
Haiti lies 800 miles off the Florida coast but seems a world away. Decades of polit­i­cal unrest and nat­ural dis­as­ters have dis­sem­i­nated its once large cof­fee sec­tor, thought to have at one time pro­duced half of the global mar­ket. Between 1998 and 2002, annual cof­fee exports fell to only four mil­lion dol­lars, less than one sixth their for­mer size. Today it is a frac­tion of that.

Belief in Haiti’s poten­tial as a high-quality cof­fee pro­ducer runs strong among cof­fee pro­fes­sion­als. Many remem­ber a taste rad­i­cally dif­fer­ent from other Caribbean cof­fees, such as Cuban and Dominican.  What is being dis­cov­ered is that if wild Haitian cof­fees (Typica) are allowed to mature and grow, numer­ous taste pro­files emerge—provided that peo­ple are trained in pick­ing, sort­ing, and pro­cess­ing. But there is much work to do in rebuild­ing the spe­cialty cof­fee indus­try in Haiti.

Hemisphere Coffee Roasters is work­ing with in-country part­ners to put the pieces together to see an “eco­nomic lift” sweep through this region through the pro­duc­tion of spe­cialty grade cof­fee. At 1500 meters, they have excel­lent coffee-growing con­di­tions. Our eval­u­a­tion and cup­pings have pro­duced fan­tas­tic results. Chocolaty and caramel notes with low acid­ity impressed Paul Kurtz, a cer­ti­fied Q-Grader work­ing on this project.

Benefits
ServeHAITI, a health­care and eco­nomic devel­op­ment NGO in Haiti, has tar­geted the Grand Bwa region in the Ouest Department. Sixty thou­sand peo­ple live in this region bor­der­ing the Dominican of Republic.  Most have no access to health­care, and very lit­tle edu­ca­tion or opportunity.

Hemisphere Coffee Roasters has been work­ing with indi­vid­ual farm­ers and farmer groups in Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Thailand over the past 8 years, enabling grow­ers to reach their full poten­tial and access mar­kets pre­vi­ously unavail­able to these farm­ers. Recently, Hemisphere Coffee Roasters’ owner and green cof­fee buyer, Paul Kurtz, was invited by ServeHAITI to join them in work­ing at an eco­nomic devel­op­ment project involv­ing restora­tion of spe­cialty cof­fee production.

Coffee is cur­rently grow­ing in small plots under a fairly thick shade cover. Because of the lack of mar­kets and tech­ni­cal know-how many of these plots are shrink­ing, mak­ing room for crops with a more imme­di­ate return such as corn and beans. We are work­ing with Floresta, a NGO that already has farmer groups orga­nized, to dis­trib­ute an improved vari­ety of cof­fee to these groups. A struc­ture has been put in place to buy only ripe cher­ries and do the pro­cess­ing at cen­tral buy­ing sta­tions across the region.

Readers can help by
We are look­ing for fund­ing to pur­chase sev­eral pieces of equip­ment to set up at our final pro­cess­ing and sort­ing area out­side Saint Pierre. A facil­ity is secured that will house this oper­a­tion. Equipment to pur­chase is sev­eral small de-pulpers and a huller to shell the parch­ment (for the wet-processed) and hull for nat­u­rals. Anyone inter­ested in dis­cussing how you might get directly involved are invited to con­tact Paul Kurtz at Hemisphere Coffee Roasters.

Project Contact:
Paul Kurtz

Email:
store@hemispherecoffeeroasters.com

Phone:
937−834−3230

Project URL:
hemispherecoffeeroasters.com

Location:
Haiti, Grand Bwa Region

Project Impact:
Sixty Thousand peo­ple live in this region, many are small crop farmers.

Crop and Community Improvement for the Village of El Socorro de la Penitas, Honduras

Categories: 2015, JulyTags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Author:

Project Description
Since 2011, Crimson Cup has been work­ing with small­holder cof­fee farm­ers in the vil­lage of El Socorro de la Penita, Honduras to develop a sus­tain­able cof­fee har­vest and a bet­ter qual­ity of life. We make reg­u­lar vis­its to advise the farm­ers on grow­ing and pro­cess­ing tech­niques. We also pay a higher-than-market price for cof­fee through the local Coop Cultivadores del Reino.

In 2014, we began work­ing with local com­mu­nity leader, farmer, and wet mill owner David Lopez to improve the fla­vor pro­file of his cof­fee through honey-processing. This year, we helped him build a solar dryer at the wet mill.

We’re also work­ing with com­mu­nity lead­ers to improve the qual­ity of edu­ca­tion at the one-room Jose Cecilio de Vallle ele­men­tary school, which serves over 70 students.

As part of our com­mit­ment, we have con­nected El Socorro to the rich resources of the Ohio State University, the nation’s largest land-grant insti­tu­tion. For the past three years, we have spon­sored ser­vice learn­ing trips to El Socorro by stu­dents from the col­leges of Agriculture, Business, Education, Engineering and Nursing, who learn about the cof­fee pro­duc­tion cycle, study socioe­co­nomic issues fac­ing cof­fee farm­ers and develop rela­tion­ships in the farm­ing community.

Benefits
Working with David Lopez and other local farm­ers since 2011, we’re see­ing sig­nif­i­cant impact in the qual­ity of cof­fee and edu­ca­tion at Jose Cecilio del Valle ele­men­tary school.

We have con­sulted with David on a honey pro­cess­ing tech­nique that improves the qual­ity of the cof­fee. This past year, we helped to build solar dry­ing racks at the com­mu­nity wet mill.

At the school, we employed an Indiegogo crowd-funding cam­paign to raise $4,800 for a sup­ple­men­tal English-speaking teacher at the ele­men­tary school. We also worked with a Columbus-area ele­men­tary school, whose stu­dents raised $3,800 for schol­ar­ships to enable El Socorro stu­dents to attend school beyond the sixth grade. We also have donated books and desks for a library and com­puter lab.

During annual ser­vice learn­ing trips, Ohio State University stu­dents meet with teach­ers and local stu­dents, par­tic­i­pate in class­room ses­sions and engage stu­dents in learn­ing activ­i­ties. They are also con­sult­ing with the local teach­ers to obtain mate­ri­als to teach English.

In 2014, OSU stu­dents iden­ti­fied the need for neb­u­lizer machines to help local med­ical work­ers treat res­pi­ra­tory ill­nesses, which are preva­lent in the area. On this year’s trip, stu­dents brought plans and mate­ri­als for neb­u­liz­ers. They assem­bled six neb­u­liz­ers and taught local med­ical work­ers how to build their own machines.

Readers can help by
Purchasing El Socorro Honduras cof­fee from Crimson Cup Coffee & Tea. Through our Friend2Farmer Direct Trade Program, Crimson Cup pays an above-market price for El Socorro cof­fee. The local farm­ers are then able to invest in bet­ter cul­ti­va­tion meth­ods and the local com­mu­nity school. Coffee can be pur­chased at www.crimsoncup.com/store/buy-coffee/friend-2-farmer-coffee

Project Contact:
Melissa Rogner

Email:
mrogner@crimsoncup.com

Phone:
614−252−3335

Project URL:
www.crimsoncup.com/about/friend-2-farmer

Location:
Honduras, Village of El Socorro de la Penitas, Honduras

Project Impact:
This project is work­ing to improve the qual­ity of life for 21 cof­fee farm­ers of Coop Cultivadores del Reino, their work­ers and more than 70 stu­dents at the local Jose Cecilio de Valle ele­men­tary school.

& Food Sovereignty">The Roya Recovery & Food Sovereignty

Categories: 2015, JulyTags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Author:

Project Description
The Roya fun­gus has dev­as­tated cof­fee pro­duc­tion in Central America, includ­ing the Ixil region of Guatemala, where cof­fee farm­ers have lost over 75% of their cof­fee pro­duc­tion. Small-scale cof­fee farm­ers have had their liveli­hoods destroyed, which has mag­ni­fied the deep poverty that already exists there.

The Roya Recovery Project trains cof­fee farm­ers in the use of effec­tive microor­gan­isms (EMs) to defend their cof­fee plants against the dev­as­tat­ing fun­gus. EMs kill La Roya on the leaves, starve La Roya in the soil, and break­down nutri­ents in the soil rapidly for plants to absorb quickly for quicker plant nourishment.

The project trains farm­ers in soil replen­ish­ment using organic com­post, cover crop­ping and ash, and trains farm­ers to effec­tively prune a per­cent­age of their farms each year, ‘cleans­ing’ old cof­fee plants of unneeded branches that use up too much of the plant’s energy.

The project trains farm­ers in pro­duc­ing ‘live bar­ri­ers’ – fruit trees, canopies, etc. – that pro­vide shade and pro­tect plants against wind, rain and ero­sion as well as hard bar­ri­ers such as rocks to pro­tect organic farms against non organic runoff from other farms.

The Roya Recovery Project grew out of The Food Sovereignty Project, which was estab­lished to help fam­i­lies over­come chronic hunger all too preva­lent even when pro­duc­tion is good. Both projects uti­lize many of the same organic agri­cul­tural prac­tices, and both projects employ the shared learn­ing prin­ci­ples of Campesino a Campesino, which pro­motes lat­eral learn­ing from farmer to farmer and empow­ers farm­ers in every aspect of their lives.

Benefits
Through organic prac­tices, the farm­ers from Asociacion Chajulense will recover their lost cof­fee pro­duc­tion and increase their pro­duc­tiv­ity to sig­nif­i­cantly improve their income from cof­fee. The farm­ers will also learn appro­pri­ate, organic prac­tices that will pre­vent La Roya from return­ing in the future, and pro­tect against a host of other blights. The farm­ers learn through the prin­ci­ples of Campesino a Campesino. These shared learn­ing prin­ci­ples, from farmer to farmer, allow farm­ers to become empow­ered and inspired in every aspect of their lives.

Inextricably linked to Food Sovereignty, the project teaches women how to estab­lish their own fam­ily gar­dens, use rich organic com­post to nour­ish their soil, care for the hens to pro­vide large quan­ti­ties of eggs for fam­ily con­sump­tion and much-needed pro­tein, and also to sell extra egg pro­duc­tion for added income. The project also trains fam­i­lies to con­struct their own in-home, effi­cient, ven­ti­lated stoves. These stoves sig­nif­i­cantly reduce the bil­low­ing black smoke that is caused by unven­ti­lated in-home stoves, which causes severe and often fatal res­pi­ra­tory ill­nesses and stunted brain devel­op­ment amongst children.

Readers can help by
Readers can help by mak­ing a con­tri­bu­tion to The Coffee Trust and des­ig­nat­ing it for either the Roya Recovery Project or The Food Sovereignty Project.

Readers can also help by inquir­ing at The Coffee Trust about obtain­ing infor­ma­tion, mate­ri­als, posters, and video graph­ics to be used inside cafes for cus­tomers to learn more about La Roya, and Food Sovereignty.

Readers can also host a fundraiser in their own café or pro­mote in-store fundrais­ers to their whole­sale clients. The Coffee Trust pro­vides all of the mate­ri­als. All the café has to pro­vide is the space and the time to host the fundraiser. The Coffee Trust pro­vides all the rest.

Project Contact:
Bill Fishbein

Email:
bill@thecoffeetrust.org

Phone:
505−690−5834

Project URL:
thecoffeetrust.org

Location:
Guatemala, Asociacion Chajulense farm­ers are amongst the most mar­gin­al­ized cof­fee pro­duc­ers in the world. The asso­ci­a­tion was estab­lished in the mid­dle of Guatemala’s 36-year civil war and became a bea­con of hope in this dark period of Guatemala’s his­tory. Today, much of its cof­fee pro­duc­tion is sourced directly by spe­cialty, Fair Trade cof­fee roast­ers. Even before La Roya struck, the region was deeply impov­er­ished and addi­tion­ally dev­as­tated by the civil war.

Project Impact:
The project involves 500–750 cof­fee farm­ers and their fam­i­lies affect­ing any­where from 2,500 to 4,000 people.

Keeping Up in a Competitive Global Market Means Better Life for Coffee Farmers in Indonesia

Categories: 2015, JulyTags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Author:

Project Description
Because of its abun­dant rain­fall and fer­tile soil, the Gayo region of Indonesia is glob­ally rec­og­nized for the mar­ket poten­tial of its high-quality Arabica cof­fee. But many farm­ers lack the skills and knowl­edge to grow the quan­tity and qual­ity of cof­fee that would help them keep up in a com­pet­i­tive global market.

While cof­fee coop­er­a­tives are expand­ing to meet the global demand for cof­fee from Gayo, not all are suc­ceed­ing in the inter­na­tional mar­ket­place. Despite increased inter­est, many coop­er­a­tives strug­gle to take full advan­tage of the inter­na­tional mar­ket. Many lack man­age­ment and gov­er­nance skills and have lim­ited capac­ity to pro­vide ser­vices that improve the qual­ity and yield of mem­bers’ coffee.

That’s why Lutheran World Relief (LWR), in part­ner­ship with Fair Trade USA, Progreso, and Rabobank Foundation began work­ing with four cof­fee coop­er­a­tives in the Gayo region. Through this project, LWR is bring­ing our nearly 30 years of expe­ri­ence work­ing with cof­fee pro­duc­ers to Gayo by help­ing farm­ers improve cof­fee qual­ity, increase pro­duc­tiv­ity, improve access to cap­i­tal and become stronger busi­ness part­ners, all lead­ing to a bet­ter life for farm­ing families.

Benefits
Sulastri is a mother of three who sup­ports her fam­ily by grow­ing cof­fee on about 2.5 acres of land in the Gayo region. She’s also a mem­ber of Permata Gayo coöperative.

Through this project, Sulastri and her hus­band have learned to bet­ter care for their cof­fee trees and to use improved agri­cul­tural meth­ods that help them grow a greater yield of higher qual­ity cof­fee. “I learned about prun­ing the trees and cut­ting the branches so sun­light can go inside [and reach more of the plant],” Sulastri says.

LWR facil­i­tated the instal­la­tion of eight wet mill pro­cess­ing facil­i­ties and organic fer­til­izer facil­i­ties and trained about 200 farm­ers to pro­duce their own organic fer­til­izer using over­ripe fruit that is read­ily avail­able on their own farms a much-improved prac­tice com­pared to their tra­di­tional prac­tice of sim­ply using cof­fee pulp and dried leaves as fertilizer.

They’ve learned to reuse the water from cof­fee wash­ing, mix­ing it with palm sugar to speed up the com­post­ing process. Each week the group pro­duces 200–400 kg of organic fertilizer.

To strengthen the orga­ni­za­tional capac­ity of the coop­er­a­tives, LWR pro­vided gov­er­nance and man­age­ment train­ing so coop­er­a­tives can pro­vide bet­ter ser­vices to mem­bers and form stronger rela­tion­ships with lend­ing insti­tu­tions and buyers.

For farm­ers like Sulastri, this work means a great deal. She says, “If we have a good har­vest, cof­fee ful­fills our daily needs.”

Readers can help by
Lutheran World Relief believes that sat­is­fy­ing grow­ing global demand for cof­fee and cocoa and improv­ing the lives of farm­ers can – and should – go hand in hand. Through our Ground Up Initiative, we are actively apply­ing suc­cess­ful project method­olo­gies to improve the lives of small­holder cof­fee and cocoa farm­ers around the world. You can sup­port this work with a dona­tion to LWR at lwr.org, or by fol­low­ing us on Facebook (facebook.com/LuthWorldRelief) or Twitter (twitter.com/LuthWorldRelief).

For com­pa­nies inter­ested in learn­ing more about cof­fee from the Gayo region, we invite you to take part in Temu Kopi — now in its third year — where rep­re­sen­ta­tives from across the Indonesian cof­fee value chain come together for dis­cus­sions on issues of impor­tance to the cof­fee com­mu­nity. For more infor­ma­tion on Temu Kopi, please email temukopi@lwr.org.

Lutheran World Relief works to improve the lives of small­holder farm­ers and peo­ple expe­ri­enc­ing poverty in Africa, Asia and Latin America, both in times of emer­gen­cies and for the long term. With the finan­cial sup­port of U.S. Lutherans and other donors, LWR strength­ens com­mu­ni­ties through pro­grams in agri­cul­ture, cli­mate and emer­gency oper­a­tions. LWR works with part­ners, sup­port­ers and tech­ni­cal assis­tance providers to achieve last­ing results.

Project Contact:
Rick Peyser

Email:
rpeyser@lwr.org

Phone:
802−899−8996

Project URL:
programs.lwr.org/gayo

Location:Indonesia, Gayo region of Indonesia

Project Impact:
This project works with 5,270 small-scale cof­fee pro­duc­ers and del­e­gates and will reach 26,350 people.

Opportunity Center

Categories: 2015, JulyTags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Author:

Project Description
The Sun Ministries’ Opportunity Center uti­lizes sewing to bring oppor­tu­nity to peo­ple locked in poverty. Our Sewing Center is a skill-building and employ­ment cen­ter located in the inner city of North St. Louis. We use dis­carded cof­fee bean bags and repur­posed fab­ric to pro­duce fash­ion­able mes­sen­ger bags and purses. Through the pro­duc­tion of these prod­ucts we help sin­gle moth­ers, those recov­er­ing from addic­tion, the home­less, and ex-offenders to learn skills, earn income and break the cycle of poverty.

The project takes in those with seri­ous obsta­cles to self-sufficiency and helps them to earn income, improve skills and over­come the obsta­cles that hold them in poverty. We offer assis­tance in remov­ing out­stand­ing war­rants, obtain­ing G.E.D.’s and driver’s licenses, and mak­ing plans to improve income and edu­ca­tion lev­els to become more self-sufficient.

A sin­gle mom can be trained in var­i­ous aspects of sewing in our pro­gram. We can then sup­ply them with a sewing machine and mate­r­ial so they can work from home. This over­comes the obsta­cle of obtain­ing child­care and opens oppor­tu­nity that would oth­er­wise be unavailable.

Our project takes peo­ple where they are and works with them to achieve their goals. We do not limit our ser­vice to a set num­ber of weeks. We will work with them as long as it takes to over­come their obstacles.

Benefits
We divert around 4000 cof­fee bags and hun­dreds of yards of fab­ric from enter­ing land­fills each year. As we pro­duce these prod­ucts, we teach valu­able skills to our par­tic­i­pants and use the income to over­come obsta­cles in their lives and move them from wel­fare to self-sufficiency.

The women can set up to work at home in some cases, which over­comes the obsta­cle of child­care that keeps so many locked in poverty. By help­ing the moth­ers we also increase oppor­tu­nity for their chil­dren. The skills gained in the Sewing Center can help them to start their own micro-businesses. We assist them in all aspects of busi­ness train­ing and start-up.

We are located in a gen­er­a­tionally poor area. Unemployment in our neigh­bor­hood is esti­mated at between 40–50%. Many that we help are hin­dered by a lack of edu­ca­tion and trans­porta­tion that pre­vents them from obtain­ing employ­ment. Our project helps the hope­lessly trapped to have hope and oppor­tu­nity. By offer­ing a work-at-home option we help young sin­gle moth­ers to become pro­duc­tive income earn­ers and escape the wel­fare cycle.

Readers can help by
Our project relies on prod­uct sales to be suc­cess­ful. We are look­ing for resellers to dis­trib­ute our prod­ucts. We can ben­e­fit from dona­tions of func­tional indus­trial sewing machines. We have many non-working sewing machines and could ben­e­fit from hav­ing some­one with sewing machine repair expe­ri­ence visit us in St. Louis to repair machines. We need to have our staff trained in sewing machine repair and are will­ing to send them to another loca­tion for that train­ing. We can use dona­tions of black thread and rotary cut­ters. Cash dona­tions are always helpful.

Project Contact: Dr. Terry M. Goodwin
Email: terry@sunministries.org
Phone: 636−544−2151
Project URL: sunministries.org
Project Name: Opportunity Center
Location: United States, St. Louis Missouri
Project Impact: Helping many sin­gle moth­ers and dis­ad­van­taged women in the inner city of North St. Louis.

Pathways to Literacy– Educating the Next Generation

Categories: 2015, JulyTags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Author:

Project Description
When a child enters a library, she finds a cozy place to learn, to engage with friends and to let her imag­i­na­tion run free. Children dis­cover new expe­ri­ences and new sources of inspi­ra­tion and enjoy­ment.  Encouraged to explore on their own, chil­dren can direct their own learn­ing by pur­su­ing sub­jects that inter­est them. Without libraries, these child­hood oppor­tu­ni­ties are lost for­ever. Pueblo a Pueblo believes that invest­ing in school libraries and lit­er­acy pro­grams fos­ters a life­long love of learn­ing. Assisted by our Pathways to Literacy project, pub­lic pri­mary schools are estab­lish­ing child-friendly school libraries, pro­vid­ing age-appropriate books and edu­ca­tional resources and devel­op­ing teacher capac­ity through lit­er­acy train­ing. Today, more than 1,200 chil­dren from rural cof­fee com­mu­ni­ties around Lake Atitlan, Guatemala, are engaged in daily library– and classroom-based lit­er­acy activities.

Guatemala has one of the low­est lit­er­acy rates in all of Latin America. Disproportionately affected are rural, often indige­nous, cof­fee farm­ing com­mu­ni­ties. The region around Lake Atitlan, an impor­tant coffee-producing region, is no excep­tion. Children’s read­ing and com­pre­hen­sion achieve­ment is stunted due to a sys­temic lack of access to lit­er­acy mate­ri­als and trained edu­ca­tors. At the root of this illit­er­acy are impov­er­ished com­mu­ni­ties and an edu­ca­tional sys­tem that fails to keep poor chil­dren in school or to offer them the basic skills they need to improve their lives.

Benefits
Pueblo a Pueblo’s pro­gram equips Guatemalan chil­dren with the skills and resources they need to stay in school, become lit­er­ate, and thrive aca­d­e­m­i­cally. We pro­vide edu­ca­tors with train­ing to use a broad range of teach­ing strate­gies to keep stu­dents engaged and inter­ested while pro­mot­ing learn­ing oppor­tu­ni­ties for stu­dents to see beyond text­books and class­rooms. We engage older stu­dents who pro­vide lead­er­ship by becom­ing “read­ing bud­dies,” enabling them to read to and work with younger stu­dents. By spon­sor­ing lit­er­acy camps dur­ing school hol­i­days, we engage chil­dren who may not be cur­rently enrolled in school and encour­age fam­i­lies to return their chil­dren to the class­room. Our ulti­mate aims are to cre­ate a love of read­ing and writ­ing both inside and out­side of school that will pre­pare chil­dren for life­long success.

Access to qual­ity edu­ca­tion, books and libraries are crit­i­cal to ensur­ing that chil­dren in vul­ner­a­ble cof­fee com­mu­ni­ties around Lake Atitlan have a brighter future.

Readers can help by
There are sev­eral ways you can help Pueblo a Pueblo pro­mote lit­er­acy in Guatemalan cof­fee com­mu­ni­ties. You can donate money for books and resources or help fundraise for a library at a new school. Pueblo a Pueblo is also seek­ing oppor­tu­ni­ties to equip libraries with advanced tech­nolo­gies, such as e-books, to give stu­dents inter­ac­tive tools to sup­port and enhance early learn­ing and literacy.

For more infor­ma­tion visit Pueblo a Pueblo’s web­site at www.puebloapueblo.org/.

Project Contact: Rosemary Trent
Email: rtrent@puebloapueblo.org
Phone: 202−302−0622
Project URL: puebloapueblo.org
Location: Guatemala, Solola, Lake Atitlan

Project Impact: The project will directly impact 1200 pri­mary school chil­dren and will impact another 2000 indi­vid­u­als indi­rectly through com­mu­nity outreach.

Read With Me!

Categories: 2015, JulyTags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Author:

Project Description
The Educar Foundation has pro­duced more than 37 mil­lion chil­dren books that are dis­trib­uted to pub­lic schools, social orga­ni­za­tions and libraries free of charge through the Leia Comigo! (Read with Me!) pro­gram over the last 15 years. The goal of Read with Me! is pro­mot­ing the devel­op­ment of read­ing habits and civic values.

In Patronício City at Minas Gerais State in Brazil, where the cof­fee farm is located, we will dis­trib­ute 5 thou­sand books for local pub­lic schools and fam­i­lies in 2015.
Read with Me! devel­oped a more local and a spe­cific project at Patrocínio that includes, once a year, offer­ing a week of extra activ­i­ties to strengthen the dis­tri­b­u­tion of the books and con­tribute to the local edu­ca­tional net­work. During this week we pro­mote:
a)     an event for teach­ers with a keynote speaker, empha­siz­ing the impor­tance of a good edu­ca­tion and the incen­tive for read­ing;
b)     Trails Educators in the cof­fee farm DATERRA with the farm´s staff agron­o­mists engi­neers to talk about the impor­tance of the envi­ron­ment and its preser­va­tion;
c)     moments of relax­ing and sto­ry­telling to develop a taste for reading.

Benefits
The local dis­tri­b­u­tion of books has a big impact on the kids, devel­op­ing read­ing habits and civic val­ues that will increase their oppor­tu­ni­ties for improve­ments in their lives. The keynote speaker brings new con­cepts of edu­ca­tion to open the teach­ers’ mind­sets regard­ing how to get kids to like school.

The edu­ca­tion trails fas­ci­nate the kids and engage them on the respon­si­bil­ity of tak­ing care of their environment.

The sto­ry­telling at the farm is a rich moment where the kids find joy in read­ing for some­one and take that back to their fam­i­lies. The kids bring home the books and they often read for the par­ents who usu­ally don´t know how to read.

Readers can help by
Readers can help with extra dona­tions so we can increase the trail activities!

Project Contact: Fundação Educar DPaschoal
Email: evilin.campos@daterracoffee.com.br and c.camila.figueiredo@educardpaschoal.org.br
Phone: 55−19−3728−8170
Project URL: www.daterracoffee.com.br/#/ids-sustentability-fundacaoeducar
Location: Brazil, Patronício City at Minas Gerais State in Brazil
Project Impact: 220 local teach­ers, 25 local stu­dents, 170 fam­i­lies, over 5 thou­sand peo­ple will be impacted.

SHOAM)">Sustainable, Humane, and Organic Agriculture Movement (SHOAM)

Categories: 2015, JulyTags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Author:

Project Description
Fifty agri­cul­tural fam­i­lies, rang­ing from 5–10 mem­bers in size, will learn to purify water, build solar water-heaters, har­vest bio-gas, and pro­duce organic fer­til­iz­ers for per­sonal use and com­merce. These fer­til­iz­ers, in both solid and liq­uid form, will be dis­trib­uted over time to the greater sur­round­ing areas, and even­tu­ally through­out the entire province of Imbabura, Ecuador (pop­u­la­tion 14,000).  Replacing chem­i­cal fer­til­iz­ers with organic solu­tions pro­tects the health of the peo­ple and the land in highly bio-diverse areas of the world.

This is a remark­able and holis­tic approach to phil­an­thropy cre­ated by the peo­ple who have lived in Villa Flora.  The Vashon Island Rotary Club in col­lab­o­ra­tion with the Quito Rotary Club of Ecuador has cho­sen cof­fee pro­duc­ers in Villa Flora, Ecuador to pilot the SHOAM project. In the future, SHOAM will broaden its base to other agri­cul­tural loca­tions within Guatemala.

The pilot is expected to run 1–2 years.  As part of the sus­tain­able model, Rotary will pro­vide lead­er­ship, mon­i­tor­ing, and the sup­plies for water purifi­ca­tion, solar water-heaters, bio-gas extrac­tion, and fer­til­izer pro­duc­tion. The Quito School of Chemical Engineering will teach the vil­lagers all the nec­es­sary skills to cre­ate the sus­tain­able model. The vil­lagers con­tribute through labor and learn­ing. Each fam­ily will main­tain a bio­mass digester system.

Benefits
The Villa Flora com­mu­nity grows a vari­ety of con­sum­ables includ­ing cof­fee. Currently the stan­dard farm­ing prac­tice includes use of com­mer­cial chem­i­cal fer­til­iz­ers for pro­duc­tion. The local area already boasts an organic cof­fee co-operative. The SHOAM project will allow vil­lagers of Villa Flora to meet the co-operative’s organic require­ment. In addi­tion, fer­til­izer pro­duc­tion is expected to exceed the local need, pro­vid­ing a sur­plus for sale. This would bring in an esti­mated $2000 US per month to the impov­er­ished villagers.

The SHOAM project helps pro­tect and replen­ish the very land the cof­fee is grown on, by switch­ing over to nat­ural fer­til­iz­ers. Organic fer­til­izer sales are a win-win solu­tion to halt the expo­sure of chem­i­cals to the peo­ple and the planet.

It is com­monly known that impov­er­ished peo­ple are at higher risk for dis­ease, human traf­fick­ing, and loss of oppor­tu­nity. Bringing fam­i­lies out of poverty keeps chil­dren safe and offers them a pur­suit of knowl­edge and happiness.

Readers can help by
We invite you to be a part of this excit­ing project with your con­tri­bu­tions. Please donate through our web link or con­tact Jessica Bolding. Buying cof­fee directly from Café Rio Intag sup­ports the Intag-based organic cof­fee co-operative.

Project Contact:
Jessica Bolding

Email:
info@climbforasustainablefuture.org

Project URL:
climbforsustainablefuture.org

Project Name:
Sustainable, Humane, and Organic Agriculture Movement (SHOAM)

Location:
Ecuador, Flora Villa and Intag Cloud Forest Reserve, Ecuador

Project Impact:
Fifty agri­cul­tural fam­i­lies, rang­ing from 5–10 members.

The Chajulense Women’s Savings/Micro-Credit Project

Categories: 2015, JulyTags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Author:

Project Description
In 2007, sev­eral hun­dred women-coffee-sorters from the fair trade, organic cof­fee coöper­a­tive Asociacion Chajulense, in the Ixil region of Guatemala, lost their jobs to new sort­ing equip­ment. The area is one of the poor­est, most mar­gin­al­ized regions at ori­gin.  In 2008, under the umbrella of the cof­fee asso­ci­a­tion, 20 women cre­ated Chajulense de Mujeres, a Savings/Micro-Credit group estab­lished in the hopes that one day, it might pro­vide an income for some of the hun­dreds of jobs that were lost.

The Coffee Trust pro­vided cap­i­tal for the project and intro­duced a sav­ings com­po­nent from which the women would even­tu­ally build their own cap­i­tal fund. The Coffee Trust invested in Capacity Building for the women to develop a more effec­tive, more effi­cient orga­ni­za­tion. Leadership train­ing was empha­sized along with fundrais­ing skills so the group could sus­tain itself with­out sup­port from The Coffee Trust.

After 7 years, there are 1,000 women in the pro­gram. It is 100% finan­cially sus­tain­able. It is capa­ble of pro­vid­ing loans to those 1,000 women from a cap­i­tal fund made up of the women’s savings.

Through The Coffee Trust Capacity Building Program, the women lead­ers have become finan­cially lit­er­ate, and have gained fur­ther access to low-interest and zero-interest loans from KIVA Foundation and the Swedish Embassy. In the future the pro­gram will serve thou­sands of women, far more than the hun­dreds of jobs lost in 2007.

The Coffee Trust will con­tinue to pro­vide the women with finan­cial man­age­ment skills to cre­ate the only bank for the poor in the region.

Benefits
The project helps women pro­vide an income for them­selves that is not depen­dent upon the very volatile cof­fee trade.  The income helps them buy food for their fam­i­lies where cof­fee has fallen short.  The project teaches women finan­cial lit­er­acy, such as how to make a house­hold bud­get. The project teaches women how to man­age their small busi­nesses.  The project teaches women to how to run a major bank­ing institution.

By pro­vid­ing a sig­nif­i­cant part of their fam­ily income, the women gain a voice in their own home, and a voice in their own com­mu­nity.  In the process, the women gain self-confidence. They become empow­ered and inspired. They see hope where they could only see despair. They see oppor­tu­ni­ties where they had only seen lim­i­ta­tions.  They see a future filled with pos­si­bil­i­ties instead of one that has nowhere to go.

The project inspires women not only in the area of money and income.  It inspires the women in every aspect of their lives.

Readers can help by
Readers can help Chajulnese de Mujeres develop into a major bank for the poor in the Ixil region of Guatemala by sup­port­ing The Coffee Trust’s Capacity Building pro­gram. The pro­gram is train­ing Chajulnese de Mujeres in finan­cial man­age­ment so they can effec­tively and effi­ciently develop their suc­cess­ful women’s sav­ings and credit project into a major bank for the poor in the region.

Contributions to The Coffee Trust should be des­ig­nated for the Chajulense Women’s Micro-Credit Project.

Readers can also help by inquir­ing at the Coffee Trust for pro­mo­tional mate­r­ial that can be used inside cafes to inform cof­fee cus­tomers about the com­plex­i­ties of life at ori­gin and what is being done to help cof­fee farm­ers and their fam­i­lies build sus­tain­able lives.

Project Contact:
Bill Fishbein

Email:
bill@thecoffeetrust.org

Phone:
505−690−5834

Project URL:
thecoffeetrust.org

Location:
Guatemala, San Gaspar Chajul, Quiché Guatemala,

Project Impact:
1,200 fam­i­lies and 6,000 peo­ple will be impacted by this project.

Three Tree Coffee Shop

Categories: 2015, JulyTags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Author:

Project Description
Coffee has immense poten­tial to make a last­ing global impact.  Whether it is a farmer’s liveli­hood or a sim­ple cup of moti­va­tion, cof­fee is vital to peo­ple from all places and walks of life.  This is why we want to use cof­fee as a medium for change.  Many of us in the cof­fee indus­try know about the strug­gles of cof­fee farm­ers.  At Three Tree Coffee Roasters, we strive to take care of our farm­ers by part­ner­ing with orga­ni­za­tions, such as: Fair Trade USA, Café Femenino, and Thrive Farmers.  As we grow, we hope to form direct trade rela­tion­ships through which we can estab­lish ini­tia­tives catered to a spe­cific community’s needs.  But why stop at the cof­fee farmer, who in many instances can be con­sid­ered a labor traf­fick­ing vic­tim?  We want to see ALL vic­tims of ALL types of slav­ery set free.  This is why we are open­ing a cof­fee shop to go along with our roast­ing oper­a­tion.  Coffee shops attract peo­ple from all walks of life around a drink.  We hope to take advan­tage of this oppor­tu­nity to spread aware­ness about human traf­fick­ing through fundraiser events and by part­ner­ing with local and inter­na­tional orga­ni­za­tions.  We don’t want to re-create the wheel.  Instead, we want to pull the good wheels together to start a movement.

Benefits
A tree is a source of life in many ways.  By sell­ing artisan-roasted spe­cialty cof­fee, we want to give life in 3 ways: empower our farm­ers, end human traf­fick­ing, and engage our com­mu­nity.  We are already mak­ing an impact in the cof­fee indus­try and the traf­fick­ing indus­try through our roast­ing oper­a­tions.  This cof­fee shop will expand the reach of our mis­sion and the level of our impact by giv­ing us more inter­ac­tion with our com­mu­nity.  This will pro­vide an avenue to spread aware­ness about human traf­fick­ing, which is vital to see­ing an end to this injus­tice.  On a lighter note, this cof­fee shop will also intro­duce a blos­som­ing com­mu­nity to spe­cialty cof­fee.  Statesboro, GA is home to Georgia Southern University, one of the fastest grow­ing uni­ver­si­ties in the south­east United States.  This com­mu­nity is primed to make a global impact and eager for a unique cof­fee experience.

Readers can help by
The premise of our project is com­mu­nity.  Our world (macro-community) becomes a bet­ter place when our micro-communities part­ner together.  More so, our micro-communities thrive when they live self­lessly.  That is why this project, in a strange way, is not just about those we are try­ing to help, but it is about you.  The cof­fee farm­ers need you. The traf­fick­ing vic­tims need you.  And we are unashamed to say that we need YOU!  Please con­sider help­ing us in 3 ways:
1)     donate towards our project
2)     share our project with your friends (face­book, twit­ter, insta­gram)
3)     share our project and mis­sion with orga­ni­za­tions that have sim­i­lar missions.

Project Contact:
Philip Klayman

Email:
3treecoffee@gmail.com

Project URL:
igg.me/at/3treecoffee

Location:
United States, Statesboro, GA

Project Impact:
Countless farm­ers, traf­fick­ing vic­tims, and you.

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